DEEPTI SHARMA WIKI, AGE, HEIGHT, GIRLFRIEND, FAMILY, BIOGRAPHY & MORE

Deepthi Sharma is an Indian professional cricketer who plays for the Indian National Women’s cricket team.

DEEPTI SHARMA WIKI, AGE, HEIGHT, GIRLFRIEND, FAMILY, BIOGRAPHY & MORE

Deepthi was born on 24th August 1997 in Agra, Uttar Pradesh. She is the youngest of her seven siblings. She started going to the ground with her elder brother Sumit, a former fast bowler who played for Uttar Pradesh. Eventually, she started attending the practice sessions with her brother at the Eklavya Sports Stadium.

In one of these practice sessions, she caught the eye of Hemalata Kala, former Indian cricketer and the then chairperson of the BCCI’s women’s selection panel. Deepthi kept attending the auditions for the next few years but was overlooked because of her low age. But Hemalata Kala made sure that Deepthi got ample practice and experience by taking her to various Railway Cricket Camps.

She and Poonam Raut were involved in a record opening partnership of 320 runs against South Africa in the quadrangular series on 15 May 2017. It was the first-ever 300-plus partnership in women’s ODI cricket history. This beat both the standing women’s record of 229 and the standing men’s record of 286. Deepthi scored 188 in 160 balls, the second-highest score in women’s ODI cricket after Belinda Clark’s 229.

Deepti Sharma made history when she was involved in a record opening partnership of 320 runs against South Africa in the quadrangular series on 15 May 2017 along with Poonam Raut. Deepti was the youngest player in the Indian women’s team that played in the ICC Women’s World Cup 2017 in England. Though Deepti Sharma might not fit into the modernized and ever-changing definition of trendy, the Indian all-rounder had her priorities set. In a century where millennials pass time brewing criticism on social media, Deepti utilized the time to make her country proud. In addition to dominating the domestic circuit, Deepti has been consistent in terms of her international performances as well

The Indian women's cricket team defeated South Africa by 11 runs in the first T20I match in Surat on Tuesday. While the victory was sweet, the most memorable moment of the evening was all-rounder Deepti Sharma's extraordinary outing. Her spell helped India defend a target of 131. She ended with figures of 4/8 with three of the four overs she bowled being maidens. This is the first time that an Indian has bowled as many maidens in a T20I match. Deepti gave away runs only off the 19th ball that she bowled, two of which were wicket maidens. Deepti took two on the trot in the 9th overs

Deepti Sharma is an Indin all-rounder from Saharanpur, Uttar Pradesh. She was spotted by India’s national women’s team selector, Hemlata Kala, and initially coached by her elder brother, Sumit Sharma. She is the second-highest runs (in a single inning) in Women’s cricket with the 188 runs she scored against Sri Lanka. In that match, she also set another record with her partner, Punam Raut, for the highest partnership in either the men’s or the women’s cricket, as they staged a 320-run stand. Moreover, Deepti is the youngest Indian in women’s cricket to scalp five or more wickets in an ODI.

and a wicket in the 14th. Apart from Deepti, Shikha Pandey, Poonam Yadav, and Radha Yadav got two wickets each while Harmanpreet Kaur got one. Captain Harmanpreet also scored 43 for the hosts as they batted first. Mignon Du Preez scored a half-century, but the Proteas could not chase the target.

Deepti Sharma was born in the Uttar Pradesh’s town of Saharanpur. When she was born, she had seven siblings. Deepti’s father, Bhagwan Sharma, was a chief booking supervisor at the Indian Railways.

Deepti’s first acquaintance with cricket was by her elder brother, Sumit Sharma. Sumit started playing cricket from an early age. He was so passionate about the sport that he would go on to represent his native state in the Nayudu Trophy. Eventually, Sumit’s passion started to rub off on Deepti. Deepti was one of the happiest people she saw in his new cricket kit. She was not only excited but also proud of the fact that Sumit played cricket. Deepti would plead to her father to tell Sumit to accompany him while he goes to train,

At the age of 9-years, Deepti had accompanied Sumit on one of his net practices. Everything was to change at the Eklavya Sports Stadium, where the practices would happen. As Sharma was engrossingly watching her brother play it out on the field, at one point the ball rolled towards her. Deepti, unwittingly, threw the ball back towards the bowler. Instead, the spheroid zoomed and smashed into the stumps. It was a commendable effort and the players, including Sumit, applauded in appreciation.

A senior coach, Hemlata Kala, who was incidentally present at the stadium, watched all this happens in silence. “Who is that little boy?” she asked Sumit. Sumit replied saying that the girl with the “boy-cut hairdo” was his sister, and she had never stepped onto the cricket field in her life. Kala, who was a national selector at that time, said, “Let her play. This kid will represent India one day.” Years later, her prophecy turned out to be true.

Soon Deepti started her formal training under Sumit. However, she barely needed any tutoring in the basics of the game, her brother said. “Deepti is naturally right-handed, but she settled into a left-hander’s grip on her own, without any help from me,” he says. “Even with bowling, medium-pace seemed to be her natural choice.” Yes, medium-pace!

However, Hemlata then took Deepti under her wing. Hema di, as Deepti called her, would take her to Delhi and Allahabad. Deepti would get a few overs to bat in the nets or watch intrasquad matches in the Railways camp. During her attempt for the U19 Uttar Pradesh team, Deepti scored 65 runs and picked three wickets, and made it to the team in 2010. 

For the next two years, Deepti trained hard and played well for the U 19 UP side. However, it was a 114 against the Vidharbha women in Kanpur that allowed her to break into the senior team. This time, she did not have to wait long. The then UPCA co-selector made sure she was drafted into the senior team at just 15. 

Rita Dey, who was then the BCCI national selector (central) and the UPCA chairperson of the women’s selection committee, says that along with Deepti’s prolific returns with the bat and ball, “the young girl’s boundless enthusiasm for the game” strengthened her case for a spot in the senior team.

It was Dey who first felt that medium pace did not compliment Deepti’s strength with the bat. Kala and Rana seconded it. “This could come in the way to her selection on the national side. She is not among the tallest girls around, and her natural action seemed more suited to spin.” And soon Deepti started to spin the ball. 

Her solid performances with the Uttar Pradesh in the domestic seasons ensure she called her a deserved callup for India A. In 2014, Deepti scored an unbeaten 53 for India A and earned her maiden National team call-up

“Mithali di and I were due to play a game for the Central Zone the next day. Playing for India alongside Mithali di, that was my dream.” Incidentally, Mithali Raj had also won the Best Women Cricketer (Senior Award) and had decided to skip the event.

In November 2017, Deepti signed for the West Bengal team for the next senior women’s domestic season. After getting a no-objection certificate from the Uttar Pradesh Cricket Association, Deepti was linked to Railways and Baroda. However, Bengal joined in the offers and walked away with the best all-rounders the country has seen.

One of the reasons why she excelled in Bengal was the cultural adjustment. Within a season, Deepti had learned and was communicating with her teammates in Bangla. “Nisha Maji (her teammate) is my Bangla teacher. I have learned from her. She teaches well. I have only learned good things. I don’t even listen to any bad thing that is said.” 

“It is important to adapt to the culture you go into. The faster you get accustomed, the better it is, and it is completely upon you. The support staff here, and the teammates have played a big role in ensuring that we have a good atmosphere, which meant that it did not take much time for me to gel. Not to forget the constant support from Jhulu di, and also Mithu (Mukherjee) ma’am, who was our selector last year. It gives good motivation to perform well,” Deepti said in an interview with Women’s CricZone

Jhulan Goswami has impacted her game as well. Returning after the World T20 Championships, Deepti had to readjust to the fifty over-format for Bengal in the 2018-19 season. “I have, of course, carried the confidence from the World T20 in Windies, but it was a different format. In 50-over matches, you have to stay at the crease, so the mindset was different. The plan was to read the pitch and see how it is behaving initially before playing my shots.”

In one of the domestic matches, Deepti played at a strike rate of 66.07. This shocked a lot of viewers. After the match, she revealed that it was the specific role the team had given her. I was not concerned at all. She is a quality cricket player and the only batter in our team who could play till 50 overs. I told her to stay there and play all 300 balls,” Goswami said. 

“She is not batting regularly in the top-order in the Indian team. I told her, here you do your batting practice, and put up some good examples for other girls on how to play long, take responsibility, and build partnerships. She responded well. Every game, she tried to graft her innings. Whenever needed, she played her shots. It’s because of her contribution in every match that we won the title.”

She had come in as a No. Three and got run-out after scoring just one run by T Chetty. A 17-year-old Sharma, however, did the talking with her ball in the second innings. She took two crucial wickets of captain Mignon Preez and Nadine Moodley, who had built a solid partnership, scoring 46 and 54 respectively in the process.

Although India lost the match by four wickets, it was a big statement from the youngster to dismiss two well-set batswomen. She ended with a figure of 2/35 in an impressive debut. Over the years that followed, she became an essential part of the team and contributed with both the bat and the ball. In her third ODI itself, she had taken six wickets for 20 runs against Sri Lanka, becoming the youngest Indian Women cricketer to cross the 5-wicket mark. In February 2017, Deepti scored her first half-century. 

Deepti Sharma and Punam Raut had just created history by scoring a record-breaking 320-run partnership in under 45 overs – the most by any cricket pair, both men or women. Deepti had scored the highest score of 188-runs in that match in South Africa as the pair slaughtered any bowler that came their way.

Sharma hit an incredible 27 fours, enough to complete a century, in her blaster innings and needed just 160 balls to score 188. However, neither of the two knew about their feat until they read about the record in a Whatsapp group in a cooling session post-match.

On her T20 debut that came two years later against Australia in 2016, she finished with figures of 1/19 at an economy rate of 4.75 runs. In T20Is, Sharma has been a force to reckon with the ball. At the start of her T20I career with India, Sharma was more of a bowler than a batswoman.  And Deepti regularly chipped in with wickets. 

However, she contributed runs whenever she was moved up the order. In the second T20I of the West Indies women’s tour of India, Deepti was sent at number 3 and scored a quick 24 in 22 balls. However, after she lost her wicket, the Indian batting order fell for 106 against WI’s 132.

Deepti Sharma, an outstanding cricketer who was born on 24 August in the year 1997, is an important player in the esteemed cricket world internationally as well as domestically. She is a promising talent of the country who has the experience of playing in various different kinds of formats and is even considered the best long-term prospect for India in various kinds of formats. She was born to Sushila and Bhagwan Sharma. Amongst all her siblings, She is the youngest one. She developed her interest in the game of cricket at the tender age of 9. She is a girl who believed in consistency hence she would on daily basis ask her father to request her brother Sumit Sharma (who initially coached her) and is also a former Uttar Pradesh pacer, to take her to the ground and watch the net practices and other matches.

Indian batsman Deepti Sharma is the youngest child of former Indian Railways employee Bhagwan Sharma. Her tryst with cricket was not a pre-planned thing. Instead, it was her brother Sumit who wanted to be a cricketer. Sumit Sharma had always been very interested in the game and wanted to dedicate all of his hours to the game.

This idea was not much supported by his family, but young Deepti always stood by her brother. She fought for her, as she wanted Sumit to represent the nation. Sumit’s interest in cricket also meant that her little sister would also catch on the fever. Watching her brother, she too started getting interested in the sport.

However, there were no plans of being a cricketer, until one incident happened purely by accident. Deepti always used to accompany her brother in his net practice sessions. In one such session at the Eklavya Sports Stadium, former Indian women’s cricketer Hemlata Kala was also training.

Deepti was sitting on the sidelines, watching her brother battle it out at the nets. At one time, a ball rolled toward her. On being asked the return the ball, Deepti threw the ball directly at the stumps from quite a considerable distance. This surprised many, and most notably, Hemlata Kala. She asked for her details, and a proud Sumit stepped up to reveal that she is her brother. Even though Deepti’s career hadn’t even started, Kala predicted that the talented child is destined to represent the nation.

After being hurled with praises, Deepti decided to take cricket seriously. Under the guidance of Kala, she started practicing daily. Kala’s task was easy, as Deepti was a gifted cricketer. She trained hard for a few years, and then came the D-day – the trails for Uttar Pradesh Under-19 Women’s team.

In the trails, Sharma not only scored a brilliant knock of 65 runs with the bat but also took 3 wickets. With this, she got her ticket to the side. Since then, Sharma used to consistently performed for the Uttar Pradesh Under-19s. The team management soon realized that they are wasting her tremendous talent by keeping her tied to the junior side. At the tender age of 15, Sharma found herself rubbing shoulders with some of the biggest names in women’s cricket, as she was made a part of the Uttar Pradesh senior team.

Sharma was initially a medium pacer, alongside being a good batsman. But national selector Rita Dey, who was also associated with the Uttar Pradesh Cricket Association, gave her a crucial piece of advice. Dey knew at because of her short height, the pace is not a thing Sharma should pursue.

Instead, she asked her to switch to spin. That she did, and there has not been any looking back since. In just 2 years’ time since being called up for the Uttar Pradesh senior team, Sharma got her national call-up. She debuted in an ODI against South Africa at Bengaluru.

She could manage just 1 run with the bat but got the crucial wickets of Nadine Moodley and Mignon du Preez. Her T20I debut came more than a year later. This time, she played an unbeaten knock of 13. She also took the wicket of Beth Mooney.

Sharma created history in May 2017, when alongside Punam Raut, she created a partnership of 320 runs. 188 of those 320 runs came from Sharma, in just 160 deliveries. This partnership against Ireland broke the record of the highest ever stand in an ODI game, which previously belonged to Upul Tharanga and Sanath Jayasuriya of Sri Lanka.

She also hit 27 boundaries in the match, the most by any female cricket in an ODI. A year ago, she became the youngest Indian cricketer to take a 5-wicket haul, for her brilliant spell of 6 wickets for 20 runs against Sri Lanka. She also played brilliantly in the 2017 ICC Women’s World Cup quarterfinal against South Africa.

In 72 ODIs, Sharma has scored 1780 runs at an average of almost 35.6. She has also picked up 81 wickets at an economy rate of fewer than 6 runs per over. In 58 T20Is, she has scored 498 runs at an average of over 20. In this format, she has picked up 60 wickets and has conceded runs at a brilliant economy rate of under 6 runs per over. She has one 5-wicket haul and one century under her belt.

Today marks a lucky day for Indian Cricket. On this day, 6 years apart – two little girls were born into lower-middle-class families from Agra, Uttar Pradesh. These two girls would go on to represent India on the biggest stage, and both would be conferred with the prestigious Arjuna Award in the coming years. We, the team of Female Cricket, wish Poonam Yadav and Deepti Sharma, the happiest of birthdays. May they always do us and ourselves proud! On Deepti and Poonam’s Birthday, let’s take a brief look at their incredible journey.

Deepti made her debut just at the age of 17 against world champions, Australia – a journey that started at the net sessions of her brother, Sumit, at Eklavya Sports Stadium in Agra. In her relatively short career, Deepti has played a vital part in India’s journey to the Finals of the World Cup at Lords’ and the T20 WC. In the 54 ODI’s she has donned the Indian Blue, Sharma has scored 1417 runs, backing it up with 64 wickets. Her slower bowling has been exceptional in the shortest format, averaging more than 1 wicket-a-game (53 in 48 T20s).

Deepti’s senior compatriot, Poonam Yadav, the wily off-spinner from Agra, turns 29 years today. Her journey started like many kids of India, in a flat, much like ones in the railways’ colonies. The pocket-sized dynamite would become one of the privileged few in the Indian women’s setup to don the whites in a Test against England back in 2014. This is just within a year of her debut – exemplifying the immediate impact she made on the international circuit.

For many years, both players have been known in the domestic circuit for their ability to play the long innings. On several occasions, in both age-group and senior-level tournaments, Raut and Sharma have managed to bat through 50 overs, scoring big runs for their respective teams. While their ability to bat for long periods was never in question, the skill to score at a decent pace needed to be developed.

Over the last 12-18 months both have expanded their game and brought in shots that allow them to up the ante when required. Sharma s newfound ability to clear the straight field at will and play both the paddle and conventional sweep has made her a spinner s nightmare. Raut, on the other hand, uses the scoop and slog-sweep to good effect and is not afraid to go over the top against the pace bowlers as well.

South Africa was cruising to victory when Sharma came into a bowl and put the brakes on the scoring. Her routine was simple: amble in, pitch the ball at a good length and force the batters to do something different. The result was 10 overs for 35 runs and 2 wickets. South Africa went on to win the game, but it was much tighter than expected.

After being shunted up and down the order for the first few matches, Sharma has settled into her role in the Indian team nicely. She has not only provided stability with the bat at the top of the order, but her bowling has brought a great deal of variety and balance into the attack.

One hundred, 4 fifties, and 27 wickets into her ODI career, Sharma remains grounded and keen to work hard. That look in the eyes is still as fierce as it was all those years ago. As she has done so often with the bat for UP, Central Zone, and now for India, her aim is to play for as long as she can Lamba Khelna hai

Talk to Poonam Raut about batting and she can go on for hours. She will explain to you the intricacies of the different kinds of techniques players have; how a batter s set-up at the crease can determine which areas of the ground she is likely to target; and how she tackles different kinds of bowlers.

She will talk about how she approaches an innings while batting first or chasing and what she has worked on to allow herself to keep growing as a batter. When she speaks of scoring rates it is almost like a physics class power, momentum, strength, and angles. In a short space of time, she will convince you that there is nothing in this world better than batting, and in that time you will realize how intelligent, calculative and calm she is when it comes to that part of her game.

It was the move to Railways that allowed her to expand her game quickly: Playing for your state, you have an added responsibility of getting most of the runs as one of the main batters, explains Raut. In Railways, it is pretty much an Indian team line-up, so the onus is on maintaining a good strike rate and scoring quickly. You can take more chances because you know you have more batters to come. It is about understanding and catering to the needs of the team.

When Raut played for Mumbai, she smashed her cuts and straight drives with as much authority as she does now, but there was never any unorthodox or risky play. The Raut of Railways, however, has learned to play with freedom and an attitude that allows her to dominate at all times. That she has made such an emphatic comeback to the Indian team is a testament to her resilience and perseverance. She has looked within, enhanced her game, and through sheer weight of runs forced her way back into the squad. That aim achieved, Raut will be focused solely on her next innings. The first step is to win the Quadrangular series; then comes to the World Cup and as she says a chance to raise the profile of the women s game in India.

Ace all-rounder Deepti Sharma is counted as one of the most dependable names in the Indian women's cricket team setup. Other than being lethal with the ball in her hand, the Agra-based cricketer is also capable of keeping the scoreboard moving with the bat. She made her international debut for India in 2014 during an ODI match against South Africa. In her first game for her country, Deepti did not do many wonders with the bat. However, she chipped in with two wickets while giving away 35 runs.

So far she has played 61 ODIs and 54 T20Is for India and scored 1541 and 470 runs respectively. She played the only Test match of her career earlier this year against England. And as Deepti celebrates her 24th birthday; here we take a look at her top five performances across the format

Deepti Sharma: A 9-year-old girl from Sharanpur Uttar Pradesh started playing cricket with his brother Sumit when she was spotted by Indian women’s team selector Hemlata Kala who asked Sumit “Who is the girl in the boy-cut hairdo?” When he confirmed her at that time she said: “This kid will represent India one day” and years later her words turned out to be true. Now, she made the history of highest partnership with Punam Raut by scoring 320 runs. Moreover, she is the third-highest individual who scored 188 runs in women's cricket in an ODI.

Deepti Sharma completes her school education at Saharanpur Public School. But her College education is Not Known. We will update all the details about her college education & her education qualification very soon. Deepti Sharma started her career as an all-Rounder Indian Cricket Player. She is the current third-highest individual scorer by a woman cricketer in ODIS with 188 runs. and she is currently The 4th ranked in the top all-rounders in the ICC Cricket Rankings.

Deepti Sharma made her ODI debut on 19 March 2009 Against the West Indies Women in Sydney. Then on 19 March, she made her T20 debut against the Pakistan Women in Taunton. Then on 13 August 2014, she made her Test Debut against England Women in Wormsley.

Deepti Sharma’s Marital status is Unmarried. Her Relationship status is also Not Known. But we will update all the details about her Affairs & her Boyfriends Very soon. Deepti Sharma’s Monthly income is approx 20 Lakh to 30 Lakh Rupees INR. Her Net worth is approx 15 Crore Rupees INR. is Now 25 Years old according to 2022. Her Body Waight is approx 54 Kg & her Body Haight is approx 5’5″ Feet. Her Hair color is Black & her Eyes color is also Black.

Coach Tushar Arothe had a difficult decision to make. No one was more aware of the lack of opportunities the Indian Women’s Cricket team got to play international matches. So his recent appointment to the top job was a big responsibility. “Since I had a stint with the Indian women’s team in the past, I knew most of the players. I was aware of how they had performed. They also knew my style of functioning. It was not that I was venturing into completely unknown territory,” Arothe told this writer recently.

He knew that the Quadrangular series involving India, Ireland, Zimbabwe, and hosts South Africa was crucial to his team’s chances at the World Cup that was to follow in England a few weeks on. The confidence the team took away from this tournament would be the key to how they performed on the big stage.

But the matches in South Africa were a golden opportunity not just to prepare for the World Cup. The NWU Sports Village at Potchefstroom where the team was to stay for over three weeks, was self-contained, and given the fragile law and order situation in the country, the squad had no choice but to spend time with each other.

Arothe saw this as an opportunity to mold the players into a team that functioned as one, instead of a disparate group of small cliques. He knew from long experience that this was an endemic problem with squads that don’t get to play together often, and was not unique to his wards.

Over the following weeks, seniors were paired with juniors at the gym, relative strangers were forced to sit down together for multiple meals, and after a few days asked to say something about their partners that others wouldn’t know. Inhibitions fell away. A team was starting to come together.

The cricketing preparations however looked set to falter right at the outset. Days before the opening match, Smriti Mandhana stepped down from her opening slot because of an injury suffered at the Women’s Big Bash League. She was a crucial cog in the wheel, and in her absence, to get the campaign off to a flying start, Arothe had to get the new opening pair right.

To partner with Punam Raut, he chose 19-year-old Deepti Sharma, a batter with some experience of playing at the top of the order. He was of course acutely aware the left-right combination was always going to make it more difficult for the opposition.

By the time India faced Ireland on 15 May, the team was high on confidence having beaten all three of their opponents in previous matches. In each of the three encounters, the team had chased down modest totals easily. But Arothe saw two things that needed fixing despite the clean record thus far.

He told me: “The openers were batting too slowly and they were comfortable with that since they had had to chase small totals and it hadn’t mattered until then. I told them that they needed to be more aggressive. Going at 3 to 4 runs an over could be acceptable on English pitches that allowed excessive movement, but on these batting pitches there was no reason to not put on more runs in the first 15 overs.”

The other issue was that the team had to be prepared to put on a total that they could defend when the situation demanded. For that, they needed to practice batting first. Playing a weaker opposition like Ireland presented a ‘safe environment’ in which to do so. Accordingly, when Mithali Raj won the toss, she decided to bat first.

When Deepti Sharma and Punam Raut walked out to bat for the fourth time in just over a week, they were already comfortable opening with each other. They had been briefed by the captain and coach and were keen to put on a stand at a decent clip. What no one knew was that they were about to carve out their own slice of cricketing history.

The two started off at a modest clip with the first 50 coming in the 12th over. First Punam and then young Deepti took on the role of aggressor. Their century stand came in the 23rd over. Arothe tells me with a laugh his recollection of events at this time: “I was happy with the way they were playing even though I thought they could have pushed the pace more as we had discussed. I left the dressing room at this point and took the bowlers out to the nets behind the ground to give them some batting practice.”

Barely 45 minutes had passed when Arothe saw the trainer of the team run out gesturing to him, and clearly excited. “Do you want to pass on any message to Deepti and Punam?” Arothe waited for him to calm down and asked: “What’s the score and in how many overs?”

“200 in the 36th over,” came the reply. Arothe smiled. It was all starting to come together.  “I have nothing to tell them. Let’s go and watch them bat instead,” he replied.

The pair had scored the first 100 in 22.3 overs. The next 100 came in 13. Arothe could not have come back to his spot on the pavilion at a better time. The 250 of the innings came up in 40.3 overs, preceded by Deepti Sharma’s maiden WODI century. Soon after, it was Punam’s turn to raise her bat for the very first time.

The pace was now a blistering one. In a flurry of fours and sixes, the pair brought up the 300. The journey from 250 to 300 had taken just over three overs. Smiles adorned the faces of the ecstatic captain and coach. They knew something that the two young women out in the middle were blissfully unaware of — when their partnership crossed 286, the pair had moved ahead of the existing first wicket record in One Day Internationals (male or female). This record had stood for over a decade in the name of Upul Tharanga and Sanath Jayasuriya of Sri Lanka.

As the Indian total went past 300, Deepti Sharma and Punam Raut became the only opening pair in the history of the sport to record a triple century stand in the limited-overs format. There had been iconic pairs in ODI history — Ganguly and Tendulkar, Greenidge and Haynes, Gilchrist and Hayden. None had made this ascent. It was also the highest partnership for any wicket in Women’s ODI history.

In the 46th over with the team score at 320, Deepti Sharma was finally dismissed. She had scored 188 in 160 minutes. It was the second-highest score in Women’s ODI, and the highest by an Indian left-hander, female or male. Two overs later, Punam retired hurt. She had scored 109. Together, the pair had gone for the wilting bowlers at a blistering pace — the partnership had come at 7.03 runs per over. Slow strike rates would never be a concern again. The dam had burst. The final result of the match was a foregone conclusion by the time the Indian innings finished at 358 for 2. A shell shocked Ireland was dismissed for 109, and India won by 249 runs.

It may not have been obvious to the team then, but something had fundamentally changed that day at Potchefstroom. It was the emergence of an element that has proved to be the magic potion for some of the greatest teams in history: self-belief. A month later India was in England for the World Cup. It had been a hard grind getting here, fighting through the qualifiers. The team was finally at full strength with Smriti Mandhana at the top of the order.

The world of cricket had its attention on the usual contenders for the top prize, so when Mithali Raj and her girls made it to the semifinals, eyebrows were raised, and the naysayers both within and outside India sat up disbelievingly. That Sunday, a young girl from Punjab, turned disbelief into adulation.

Playing what was undoubtedly one of the greatest ODI innings of all time, Harmanpreet Kaur carted the famed Australian attack to all parts of the ground. When she was done, her 171 run effort along with Jhulan Goswami’s three crucial strikes had taken India into the final of the World Cup. What was even more remarkable was that Kaur was playing with an injured hand. Arothe had refused to ask for a replacement early in the tournament. “I told them that an injured Harman is better for the team than any fit replacement we can fly in. With that single brilliant innings, she justified our faith in her,” he told me.

The team would falter at the final hurdle, losing to England by nine runs at Lord’s with 26,000 spectators in the stands and a billion countrymen following every ball on television and social media. But in making it that far against all odds, and inspiring a few hundred Harmanpreets to dream of cricketing glory, Mithali Raj’s team had done more for women’s cricket in India than they could have ever imagined. And it all started at that sports village in South Africa, where a group of talented individuals came together as a team and drew inspiration from the greatest stand in the history of Women’s Cricket led by a 19-year-old. Anindya Dutta is a cricket columnist and author of four bestselling books. His latest, Wizards: The Story of Indian Spin Bowling won India’s Cricket Book of the Year award for 2019.

After that shaky start, the left-hander showed wonderful discipline, leaving balls outside off stump with great precision, forcing the bowlers to bowl at her, and taking a full toll when scoring opportunities came her way. It was a frustrating inning to watch – slow, and rather painful – but it showcased her solid temperament, technique, and a fierce focus on the job at hand. In hindsight, it was a typical Sharma knock – Lamba Wala [a long one].

Through the course of her international career, Sharma has shown the same plucky qualities with the bat. Shunted up and down the order, used as an opener in the absence of Smriti Mandhana, and later pushed down to No.3 when India was searching for solidity, she now finds herself as part of the lower-middle order in white-ball cricket. The demotion in the order, coupled with the pace at which the game has continued to evolve has meant that Sharma has had to sometimes trade that solidity for a shade more flamboyance and power. It’s led to the introduction of some more agricultural shots in her repertoire and a bit of inconsistency as well. But on Day 3 and Day 4 of India’s one-off Test against England at Bristol, when her side was searching for solidity, the Sharma of old came to their rescue.

Through the course of the innings, the left-hander’s languid approach and her time-taking routine pushed England’s patience. A visibly annoyed Brunt – already pushed to the brink by Verma – was made to wait on several occasions before Sharma was ready to face up to her. When the seamer charged in and tried to knock Sharma’s stumps out of the ground, she was met with a series of solid defensive shots. When Brunt tried to stare her down, Sharma met the fast bowler with her steely gaze, almost as if to say, ‘What are you looking at? Go do your job, like I’m doing mine!’ There was no outward aggression, no words exchanged, just a blank stare down the track. It was typical Sharma – not loud, not cocky, just there. Ever present. Ever solid.

She first shared a 70-run stand with Verma for the second wicket and followed it up with a 72-run partnership with her former opening partner Punam Raut. Her motto was simple: play close to the body and last as long as you can.

Once settled in, she played some exquisite cover drives off the seamers, and swept the spinners with utmost ease, bringing up her maiden Test 50 off 157 deliveries. Her knock not only allowed India to wipe off the deficit but also injected belief in the side when all seemed lost. Although her wicket fell against the run of play an ugly hoick across the line off Ecclestone that she will admonish herself for – Sharma had done her job for the team.

Sydney Thunder on Sunday confirmed the signing of Indian stars Smriti Mandhana and Deepti Sharma for the upcoming Women's Big Bash League (WBBL). Sydney Thunder coach Trevor Griffin said that his team's title defense had received an extra edge with Indian superstars Smriti Mandhana and Deepti Sharma signing on for the club's WBBL|07 campaign.

The pair, who are in Queensland with India's national team for the ODI series and Test match against Australia, was identified by Thunder as quality players with the ability to make an explosive impact on the T20 competition.

Mandhana starred for India in Friday night's nail-biting, final ball loss to Australia in Mackay. Her innings of 86 from 94 balls were highlighted by 11 boundaries, and it helped to set up India's competitive total of 274 runs. Sharma made her presence felt in the ODI match described as one of the most thrilling plays in Australia, with a knock of 23 runs and capturing Tahlia McGrath's wicket. Mandhana, who broke through to be ranked among the world's top three T2OI batters last July, said she would embrace the pressure on her to perform as one of Thunder's overseas players.

"I like it, it always helps," said the 25-year-old of the demands. "Playing in overseas leagues gives you a lot of experience, especially in the T20 format. Then, of course, you exchange so much experience with each other... with all the players from over the world... so you get to learn a lot." Rather than 'pressure', I always look at it as an opportunity to learn, and to get used to that pressure because it only builds when you play international cricket," she added. Sydney Thunder begins their WBBL|07 campaign - and title defense - against the Adelaide Strikers on Saturday, October 16.

The Women's World Cup is heating up with games getting intense at every step of the tournament. The latest of India’s matches saw them handed their first defeat by New Zealand. Post the loss, India will now be taking on the West Indies on March 12th at the Seddon Park in Hamilton. Notably, West Indies have punched above their weight so far in the mega event. They have won each of their two games so far and will go into the encounter against India riding high on confidence. 

In terms of all the ODI meetings between the two sides so far, India leads the West Indies by a significant number of wins. In 25 ODIs, the Indian team has won 20 matches while their opponents have come out victorious in just the five games. A similar landslide margin can be seen in World Cup matches as well. India has won in all six of their previous encounters against the West Indies at the tournament so far. 

The last World Cup meeting between the two sides came in the 2017 edition. India dominated the game right from the start. West Indies were unable to infuse much energy into their innings batting first as they folded for 183-8 in their quota of 50 overs. India then rode on a stellar 106* of 108 balls by Smriti Mandhana to chase down the total with seven wickets to spare.

All-rounder Deepti Sharma had an extraordinary outing in India’s first T20I against South Africa in Surat on Tuesday. She ended with figures of 4/8 with three of the four overs to lead India to victory. If that was not enough she bowled three maidens and made her way into the record books. This is the first time that an Indian has bowled as many maidens in a T20I match.

Deepti gave away runs only off the 19th ball that she bowled in the match. Two of these overs were wicket maidens with Deepti taking two on the trot in the 9th overs and a wicket in the 14th. The Agra girl’s spell helped India defend a target of 131.

Captain Harmanpreet Kaur scored 43 for the hosts as they batted first. Although Mignon Du Preez scored a half-century, South Africa could never get their chase going. Apart from Deepti’s three-wicket haul, Shikha Pandey, Poonam Yadav, and Radha Yadav got two wickets each while Harmanpreet got one.

Following her signing as the second overseas player in the Western Storm squad, Deepti in a statement said, "I am looking forward to the challenge of playing in the Kia Super League. Every player wants to play alongside and against the best in the world, and this will give me the opportunity to do that." "I have heard good things about Western Storm from Smriti and I can't wait to contribute to the team's success on the field," she added.

The 21-year-old Deepti holds the second position in the ICC ODI all-rounder rankings. She has played in 48 ODIs and scalped 56 wickets. She also featured in 30 T20Is and picked up 28 wickets.

Western Storm Head Coach Trevor Griffin said, "Deepti is a quality player with a huge amount of experience at the very highest level and she will bring something a little bit different to our squad this year." "She's still only 21 but she will bring a huge amount of experience and knowledge to our dressing room. She is currently rated as the second-best all-rounder in the world in one-day cricket by the ICC, so her quality is there for all to see," Griffin added.

Earlier in the month, Western Storm retained England internationals Heather Knight, Anya Shrubsole, Fran Wilson, and Freya Davies. The fourth edition of KSL is scheduled to commence on August 6 and will see six teams - Lancashire Thunder, Loughborough Lightning, Western Storm, Surrey Stars, Yorkshire Diamonds, and Southern Vipers - playing each other twice in a league format.

The top three teams qualify for finals day on September 1, with the second and third-placed sides competing for the chance to face the first-placed league winners in the final. Southern Vipers, Western Storm, and Surrey Stars have won the tournament once each in 2016, 2017, and 2018, respectively.

The Indian Women's National Cricket Team was defeated by South Africa on Sunday, marking the end of their 2022 World Cup campaign. The Women in Blue put up a valiant fight against the Proteas, taking the game to the final over of the second innings, but a no-ball from Deepti Sharma saw them crash out of the tournament in the most discouraging manner. 

India's 39-year-old captain Mithali Raj was asked about her retirement plans after the match, but the veteran player could not provide a clear response and said she is still processing the way they got beaten in the game. Mithali told reporters that she hasn't made any plans for her future yet and that it wouldn't be right for her to talk about it considering the type of game they played.

In Sunday's encounter at Hagley Oval in Christchurch, the Mithali Raj-led Team won the toss and opted to bat first. Smriti Mandhana and Shafali Verma both struck half-centuries to help the Indian women's side get off to a good start. Verma was run-out for 53 off 46 balls, while Mandhana scored 71 off 84 balls. Mithali Raj and Harmanpreet Kaur both struck 68 and 48 runs, respectively, to boost India's total. India's innings ended with a score of 274/7 in 50 overs.

South Africa responded by chasing down the target with zero balls remaining. Following the dismissal of Lizelle Lee in the fifth over, South African batters Laura Wolvaardt and Lara Goodall formed a crucial 125-run partnership. Goodall scored 49 off 69 balls, while Wolvaardt scored 80 from 79 balls.

Indian cricketer Deepti Sharma has showered praise on Team India captain Mithali Raj after the batting icon was conferred with the Major Dhyan Chand Khel Ratna Award on Saturday. Deepti, who recently joined the Sydney Thunder side, spoke at length about her memorable stint with the women's Big Bash League franchise.

Team India's Deepti and Smriti Mandhana were roped in by Sydney Thunder as replacements for English duo Heather Knight and Tammy Beaumont for the action-packed WBBL. Speaking about her maiden appearance in the Australian T20 league during a media interaction, Deepti credited Sydney Thunder coach Trevor Griffin for guiding the Indian cricketer in her fruitful stint. 

"Trevor has been very helpful. I often talk to him about my problems and he guides me very well," she said. Griffin-coached Sydney Thunder side defeated Ellyse Perry-led Sydney Sixers in match No.46 of the Big Bash League 2021 at the Harrup Park on Sunday. Deepti remained unbeaten while Mandhana smashed a quick-fire 45 off 39 balls in Sydney Thunder's six-wicket win over the Perry-led side. 

When asked about legendary cricketer Mithali, who recently received the prestigious Khel Ratna Award, Deepti hailed the Team India captain as an inspiration for many young girls who want to pursue their dreams. "Nothing can be bigger. We get inspired on seeing her. I have also learned a lot from her. I hope she keeps earning such huge awards," she said. The first woman cricketer to be conferred with the prestigious award, Mithali has played 12 Tests, 220 ODIs, and 89 T20Is for Team India. 

A maiden over is a rare feat in T20 cricket. However, Indian cricketer Deepti Sharma created a unique and historic feat in the Twenty20 International between India and South Africa as she not only bowled three maiden overs, but also three wickets in her four-over quota. This is the first time that an Indian cricketer has bowled as many maidens in a T20I match.

South Africa was chasing a modest total of 130 on a tricky pitch in Surat’s Lalabhai Contractor Stadium, but Sharma’s efforts ensured India continued to build momentum for the World T20 which ultimately led India to an 11-run victory. Deepti Sharma gave away runs only off the 19th ball that she bowled in the match. Captain Harmanpreet Kaur scored 43 for the hosts as they batted first. Apart from Deepti’s three-wicket haul, Shikha Pandey, Poonam Yadav, and Radha Yadav got two wickets each while Harmanpreet got one. The second match of the five-game series will be played on September 26. After the end of the five-match series, the teams will play three ODIs in Vadodara.

Deepti develops an interest in cricket after watching her elder brother playing cricket. She wanted him to give her cricket training. One day during net practice, her brother took her with him. She was asked to ball during the practice. She throws the ball with so much perfection that it directly hits the stumps. She got noticed by Hemlata Kala, India's National Women team selector. Then, she got trained under the supervision of Rita Day, a former Indian selector.

In 2014, she made her ODI International debut against South Africa in Bengaluru. She made the World record of scoring the highest runs as the opening pair along with Poonam Raut. Next, she got selected for the Women's Cricket World Cup in 2017. She was a member of the Indian Squad selected for the  2018 ICC World Twenty20 tournament in the West Indies. In 2022, she got selected for the 2022 Women's Cricket World Cup in Newzealand.

Hailing from a middle-class family in Uttar Pradesh, Deepti Sharma was the oldest among her seven siblings. Originally born as a right-handed batsman, Deepti later shifted towards a left-hand grip without any training. The 23-year-old has been the spearhead of India’s middle-order. In addition to that, the Indian all-rounder’s knack for picking up regular wickets at crucial intervals makes her a valuable asset to the Indian Women’s National Team.

She started going to the ground with her elder brother Sumit, a former fast bowler who played for Uttar Pradesh. Eventually, she started attending the practice sessions with her brother at the Eklavya Sports Stadium. In one of these practice sessions, she caught the eye of Hemalata Kala, former Indian cricketer and the then chairperson of the BCCI’s women’s selection panel. Deepthi kept attending the auditions for the next few years but was overlooked because of her low age. But Hemalata Kala made sure that Deepthi got ample practice and experience by taking her to various Railway Cricket Camps.

Her performances across the domestic circuit eventually impressed BCCI selectors as the latter was drafted into the Indian squad for the series against South Africa in 2014. Deepti Sharma made her ODI debut against South Africa in Bengaluru back in January 2014. Two years later, she went on to make her T20I debut against Australia when she was just 17. She took two crucial wickets of captain Mignon Preez and Nadine Moodley, who had built a solid partnership, scoring 46 and 54 respectively in the process. It was only after several recommendations from selectors and local coaches that Deepti mastered the art of spin owing to her height and the natural release of the ball.

South West [England] All-rounder Deepti Sharma became the fourth Indian cricketer to play Kia Super League (KSL) after Western Storm signed her for the upcoming fourth and final edition of the league.

Smriti Mandhana and Harmanpreet Kaur were the first two Indian cricketers who competed in the history of the T20 league hosted in England. While Jemimah Rodrigues earlier in the month signed with Yorkshire Diamonds.

Following her signing as the second overseas player in the Western Storm squad, Deepti in a statement said, "I am looking forward to the challenge of playing in the Kia Super League. Every player wants to play alongside and against the best in the world, and this will give me the opportunity to do that." "I have heard good things about Western Storm from Smriti and I can't wait to contribute to the team's success on the field," she added.

The 21-year-old Deepti holds the second position in the ICC ODI all-rounder rankings. She has played in 48 ODIs and scalped 56 wickets. She also featured in 30 T20Is and picked up 28 wickets.

Western Storm Head Coach Trevor Griffin said, "Deepti is a quality player with a huge amount of experience at the very highest level and she will bring something a little bit different to our squad this year." "She's still only 21 but she will bring a huge amount of experience and knowledge to our dressing room. She is currently rated as the second-best all-rounder in the world in one-day cricket by the ICC, so her quality is there for all to see," Griffin added.

Earlier in the month, Western Storm retained England internationals Heather Knight, Anya Shrubsole, Fran Wilson, and Freya Davies. The fourth edition of KSL is scheduled to commence on August 6 and will see six teams - Lancashire Thunder, Loughborough Lightning, Western Storm, Surrey Stars, Yorkshire Diamonds, and Southern Vipers - playing each other twice in a league format.

The top three teams qualify for finals day on September 1, with the second and third-placed sides competing for the chance to face the first-placed league winners in the final. Southern Vipers, Western Storm, and Surrey Stars have won the tournament once each in 2016, 2017, and 2018, respectively.

Name Deepti Sharma 
Full Name Deepti Bhagwan Sharma
Nickname Deepu
Profession Indian Woman Cricketer
Major teams India Women
London Spirit (Women)
Trailblazers
Years Active National Side (2014-Present)
Date of Birth August 24, 1997
Age (In 2021) 24 Years
Birth Place Agra, Uttar Pradesh, India
Residence Saharanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India
Nationality Indian
Religion Hinduism
Caste Brahmin
Mother Tongue Hindi
Zodiac / Sun sign Virgo
Height in centimeters- 155 cm
in meters- 1.55 m
in Feet Inches- 5ft 1in
Eye Colour Black
Hair Colour Black
Father Shri Bhagwan Sharma
Mother Sushila Sharma
Brother(s) Loveless Sharma
Sister(s) Pragati Sharma
Playing role Allrounder
Batting style Left-handed bat
Bowling style Right-arm off-break
Test debut June 16 - 19, 2021 vs England
ODI debut November 28, 2014, vs South Africa
T20I debut January 31, 2016, vs Australia
School Not Known
College Not Known
Educational Qualification Not Known

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